Sympathizing with Workplace Bullies Will Not Solve the Problem

By January 30, 2018 Cyber Security

Workplace BulliesA recent article in the British newspaper “The Guardian” casts doubts on a long-held belief regarding workplace bullies. The article contends that, contrary to popular belief, workplace bullies do not suffer from low self-esteem, and therefore, sympathizing with them will not help solve the problem.

According to the article: “People wrongly assume bullies have low self-esteem, but their behaviour (sic) is actually a response to internalised (sic) shame. Although some people who live with shame have low self-esteem, those who behave like bullies tend to have high self-esteem and hubristic pride. They attack others to take away their shame – which allows them to remain unaware of their feelings.”

The article goes on to determine that: “Adults at work are as vulnerable as children in the playground if they sympathise (sic) with bullies and believe they suffer from feelings of low self-esteem. Any approach to dealing with bullies will not work if it is based on the belief that a bully is consciously aware of his or her shame, or capable of remorse.”

So what is the solution? According to the article, ‘swarming’ is the best policy: “The way to deal with bullies is to unite with your co-workers. Grouping against a bully will provide victims with support for their feelings, since victims of bullies are at risk of becoming isolated. Through joining together and discussing the bully’s behaviour (sic), co-workers can contain the bully, who, with their behaviour (sic) exposed, loses the power to terrorise (sic) – and faces the threat of isolation.”

Want to know more about workplace bullying? Join us for a 30-minute free TAL Global webinar titled: Understanding and Dealing with Workplace Bullying, on  February 7, 2018. Register at: www.talglobal.com.

For additional information regarding security solutions please contact TAL Global at 408.993.1300.

Free Webinar – Workplace Bullying – Register Here

© TAL Global, 2018